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BlOGRAPHIES
David H. Adrian
Fred D. Bartleson, Jr.
Ed T. Battle
Wynn H. Beidleman
Clifford C. Bizek
Luke H. Boykin
Ronald F. Boyle
John W. Brophy
Byron W. Carell
Thomas B. Case
Tim T. Daugherty
Donald E. Elliott
Thomas W. Fischer
Elmer Funderburk
Randolph Galt
John E. Gillen
Jerome R. Goebel
Fred Horky
Varnum B. Irvine
Roland Brock Jackson
James H. Jenkins, Jr
Lou Karibo
Eugene F. Kranz
Kirby A. Krbec
Kenneth Hood Mackay, Jr.
Delbert L. Mansfield
Leo A. Meyer
Ray Miller
John F. Mitchell
Byron H. Morrill
Samuel A. Munch, Jr
Daniel J. Paukstis
Harry Pawlik
Wilbur L. Robinson
James G. Ross
Robert E. Ruppel
James D. Ryan
Galen B. Sargent
Carl B. Schutz
John A. Sells
Tilden M. Shanahan
John (Jack) R. Sladkey
Wayne D. Smith
Jerry D. Spearman
Jack Sullivan
Neil Tousley
William F. Treichel
James Trice
Andrew T. Vassios
Roger A. Wert
Howard F. Wray
Don A. Zaike
 
 
 


(no longer with us, but not forgotten)

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BANGSBERG, HOWARD V.
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___________________________________
 






BARROW, JR., WALTER J.





BEASLEY, BILLY J.
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May 1957 (B-57)

 
___________________________________






BLAHUS, FREDERICK A.

(died in nonflying accident in 1975)





BOWLING, JAMES R.
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September 1956 (T-33, Del Rio)






BROWN, SAM





BUCK, ORVILLE
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F-86

Morris "Jack" Coleman

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Cepurneek, Howard C.
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CEPURNEEK, HOWARD C.




CRAIG, DAVID




 

CORBETTA, RICHARD L.
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1957 (T-33, MacDill)

Cummings, Jack C.
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___________________________________

Jack C. Cummings

 

 

Following graduation from pilot training Jack Cummings went to Sheppard AFB in Wichita Falls, Texas an attended the Auditor General course to become a Contract Auditor and taught a contract audit course until assigned to the Milan, Italy audit office.

 

Arriving in Milan in December 1956, Jack was responsible for the audit of the Air Force contract with Republic Aviation for the transfer of F-84 aircraft to European countries.  For the next year this entailed spending two weeks in Lugarno Switzerland, where Republic had their European headquarters and then back to Milan for two week at Sia Marchetti that was performing the IRAN of C-47 aircraft.  Flying proficiency was maintained by monthly trips to Aviano AB to fly C-47s after hours around Europe.

 

In 1958 Jack was assigned to the audit office at Rein Main AB in Germany to audit a variety of research and development contracts with universities and industry in Germany, Belgium, and France as well as the modification of F-84s being given to Germany.  Proficiency flying was again maintained flying the C-47 throughout Europe including the Berlin corridor, Athens, Greece, Tripoli, Egypt, etc.

 

1959 found Jack at the SABENA Plant in Brussels, Belgium auditing the IRAN contracts for a number of Air Force aircraft before being transferred to Mather AFB, Sacramento, California.

 

From 1960 to 1966 Jack flew T-29s for navigator training around the western United States before being assigned to Air Command and Staff College in 1966 where he also took advantage of the opportunity to get a Masters degree.  Flying proficiency was again in the C-47.  Completing the command and Staff College and masters program in August of 66 resulted in an assignment to the Phyllis Ann program with duty at Tan Son Nhut, Saigon, Vietnam.

 

After going through the training pipeline at Hulbert Field, Florida, Alexandria, Louisiana survival at Fairchild AFB, Washington and jungle survival in the Philippines, Jack arrived in Vietnam.   One hundred and forty four missions and 1000 hours later flying the EC-47, out of Tan Son Nhut, Hue Phui Bai, Pleiku, and Danang, Jack was assigned to the Education with Industry Program with duty at the Boeing Company in Seattle, Washington from 1967 to 1968.

 

Upon completion of the EWI program an assignment with the Defense Contract Administration Service as Chief of the Portland Oregon Office was forthcoming.  This office was responsible for much of the wood products being sent to Vietnam as well as major component for the Navy’s nuclear submarine program and the Navy’s Mark 48 torpedo program. Proficiency flying was maintained with the Oregon National Guard in a C-54 and T-29.

 

1972 saw Jack assigned as the Director of R & D Procurement for the Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio.  This unit was responsible for support of the six AFSC laboratories in Area B heavily involved in the early space and airborne laser programs.  The first pilot training simulator was contracted for by this unit as was a good deal of the F-16 program.  As a side note this was the unit that leased the aircraft to CALSPAN that John Mitchell was involved with.

 

The Washington D.C. area called in 1974 and Jack was assigned to AFSC first as the Chief of R & D and Base procurement and then as the Director of Contract Management.

This assignment was primarily a policy job for AFSC wide coverage of procurement activities.  Flying proficiency was maintained in the C-118 until excused from flying.

This was the final USAF assignment and Jack retired in August of 1976.

 

Jack went to work for the Energy Research and Development Agency that shortly became the Department of Energy in 1976 at the Richland Operations Office in Richland, Washington (Hanford Site) as the Director of Contracts and Procurement.

Besides competing and selecting a billion dollar site operating contractor the job included the selection and award of major construction contracts for nuclear facilities and nuclear research.  To keep his hand in flying Jack acquired a new Rockwell Commander 114 for flying around the greater northwest.

 

1981 found Jack out of government and starting his own consulting business in Bellevue, Washington.  This business provided assistance to both industry and government in dealing with federal procurement issues.

 

Jacks wife Betty survived this whole adventure working for newspapers, as a teacher and later as a real estate agent all the while raising three children. We have three grown children and two granddaughters who with their parents live in Clackamas, Oregon where their mother is a stay at home mom, very active in school activities and Mary Kay.  Our oldest daughter and her husband live in Bend, Oregon where she is a teacher and our son lives in Enumclaw, Washington with his wife, Chinese born Yin Huan, and is a district systems engineer for Dictaphone.

 

Jack died on Flag Day in 2009. He received a full military funeral presided by the local VFW the following week.

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___________________________________

DAIGLE, GERALD J.
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__________________________________

DEJONG, FREDERICK J.
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2002 ( Natural)



___________________________________________





DURKIN, CHARLES R.




EVANS, JAY T.
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Evans resigned in 1972 as OU's head wrestling coach because he became disillusioned with recruiting.

“These days, you have to recruit the wrestler, his mom and dad,” Evans told a reporter at the time. “When I came to OU as a wrestler, I went to the coach and convinced him I belonged here.

“Now, it's almost as if I have to beg the athlete to come to OU, to offer him something that no one else does. You have to be a big talker with a big line and that's not the way I am.”

As the years have drifted by, Evans' greatness has been forgotten or overlooked by some in the wrestling world, but not by those who knew him best.

“He was the predecessor to Gable,” Abel said. “He was just a great, great wrestler.”



Read more: http://newsok.com/former-ou-wrestler-tommy-evans-was-superman-on-the-mat/article/3594099#ixzz1WRMc1wvw

Former OU wrestler Tommy Evans was Superman on the mat

 
BY ED GODFREY, Staff Writer, egodfrey@opubco.com    Comment on this article 1
Published: August 12, 2011
Superman and Clark Kent.
That's how those who knew Tommy Evans — a two-time NCAA wrestling champion for the University of Oklahoma in the 1950s — describe him.
photo - Former OU wrestler Tommy Evans. Photo by The Oklahoman Archive
Former OU wrestler Tommy Evans. Photo by The Oklahoman Archive

Multimedia

On the mat, Evans was fierce and unrelenting. Off the mat, he was a gentle giant.
“Tommy was really a mild-mannered guy, not boisterous in any way shape or form,” said Bud Belz, a former University of Oklahoma wrestler and pupil of Evans.
“But when he was on the mat, he was a completely different person. He was so tough and so aggressive. The toughest guy I ever met in my life.”
Evans, who also coached two national championship wrestling teams at OU in 1960 and 1963, will be inducted posthumously in the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame on Tuesday night. Evans died in 2008 at age 77.
A two-time high school state champion at Tulsa Rogers, Evans was an NCAA champion in 1952 and 1954 at 147 pounds.
He was the outstanding wrestler of the tournament both years. The only reason he didn't win in 1953 was because a knee injury sidelined him.
Evans finished his collegiate career at OU with a 42-1 record. His only loss came as a sophomore in the 1951 NCAA finals.
He won three national AAU titles and was the Pan American champion in 1955. He also was a silver medalist in the 1952 Olympics, although Stan Abel, who succeeded Evans in 1972 as OU's wrestling coach, said it is widely believed he deserved the gold.
In wrestling, Iowa's Dan Gable is considered by many to be the greatest wrestler of all time. Abel calls Evans the Dan Gable of his era.
Wayne Baughman, an Olympic coach who headed the wrestling program at Air Force for 27 years, thinks Evans would have beaten Gable.
“A lot of people will argue that point, but there is no question in my mind,” said Baughman, who wrestled for Evans at OU. “I think Tommy would have pinned him. I don't think there is anybody that has come down the road that is better than Tommy.”
As a coach, Evans would often wrestle against his own athletes after practice.
“I thought he was going to kill me,” said former Sooner and 1972 Olympic gold medalist Wayne Wells.
“I didn't think I was going to make it. He would make me stay and wrestle with him after practice. Every day he would get me in a headlock that would almost bring tears.”
Evans expected his wrestlers to work as hard as he did when competing.
“No one left his wrestling room that wouldn't be doggone tired every day,” Abel said.
Evans was a fierce competitor at everything. He often played racquetball against his Sooner wrestlers and “wouldn't let you leave until he finished thrashing you,” Belz said.
Outside of his greatness on the mat, Evans possessed another attribute that everyone admired: his honesty.
“I don't know of another coach that can say he never had a controversy with an athlete,” Wells said. “No one didn't get along with Tommy. He never alienated anyone. He was just so impeccably fair and evenhanded. He was so easy going.”
Said Abel: “I can't imagine Tommy ever lying to anybody. Most everyone who wrestled for Tommy loved him.”
Evans also was an accomplished pilot and served three years in the Air Force following his graduation from OU. In fact, he missed the 1961 season as OU's head coach because he was recalled to active duty in the Berlin crisis. After coaching, he served in the Army National Guard.
Evans resigned in 1972 as OU's head wrestling coach because he became disillusioned with recruiting.
“These days, you have to recruit the wrestler, his mom and dad,” Evans told a reporter at the time. “When I came to OU as a wrestler, I went to the coach and convinced him I belonged here.
“Now, it's almost as if I have to beg the athlete to come to OU, to offer him something that no one else does. You have to be a big talker with a big line and that's not the way I am.”
As the years have drifted by, Evans' greatness has been forgotten or overlooked by some in the wrestling world, but not by those who knew him best.
“He was the predecessor to Gable,” Abel said. “He was jus

FEATHERSTONE, JACK E.
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Golder, Ted W.

 
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Golder, Theodore W.
 
 
Theodore W. Golder
 
 
On April 27, 1956, immediately after receiving my
wings and commission, I was married at the Laughlin
AFB chapel.  Subsequently, I went to “Aircraft
Observer Training for Pilots” school at James Connally
AFB, Waco, Texas and graduated with
Navigator/Bombardier ratings.  I was then assigned to
the 98th Bomb Wing at Lincoln AFB, Lincoln, Nebraska
where I flew the B-47E until May of 1963.  My next
assignment was a three-year Air Force Institute of
Technology (AFIT) undergraduate Industrial Engineering
program at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona
which was completed in January 1966.

After receiving my degree I was sent to Sheppard AFB,
Wichita Falls, Texas as Chief of the Management
Engineering Detachment.  This job entailed measuring
the productivity and cost efficiency of the various
base activities and studying the overall need for
military manning or the cost effectiveness of using
Federal civilians versus contract civilians to provide
base support services.  My “secondary job” was as a
C-54 base flight pilot flying some 400 hours in 40
states in just eight months.

Received orders assigning me to Hurlburt Field, Fort
Walton Beach, Florida in January 1967 where I received
training in the C-123 for cargo hauling and the “Ranch
Hand” agent orange program (never flew).  After
training I was assigned to Nakom Phanom RTAFB,
Thailand in an unique program called ”caddlesticks” –
flying night missions as a forward air controller
(FAC) logging 200 combat hours in 50 missions over
Laos and North Vietnam.  Five months into my tour I
was sent TDY to Bangkok’s Don Muang RTAFB to instruct
Thai pilots in C-123 combat tactics.  During my year,
I logged 900 hours in the C-123.

Back from southeast Asia in March of 1968 I returned
to SAC with B-52 training at Castle AFB, Atwater,
California and subsequent assignment to Barksdale AFB,
Shreveport, Louisiana.  While at Barksdale, in July
1969 I returned to SEA on one”arc-light” tour
(Anderson AFB, Kadena AFB, U-Tapao AFB) logging 300
combat hours in 40 missions.  Returning to Barksdale,
I was assigned to Command Post duty which led to a PCS
as a controller at Castle AFB, California in January
1971 and a secondary job as base flight pilot flying
the T-29B.

In May of 1972 I was again selected for AFIT at
Arizona State University receiving my Masters Degree
in Engineering Management in August 1973.  Next
assignment was to the Pentagon as a Manpower
Management staff officer regulating and directing to
Command and base level manpower offices the need for
military manning and the cost effectiveness of using
Federal civilians or contract civilians in base
support functions.  I elected to retire from my Air
Force career in August 1977.

Retired in Merced, California and remain here today.
After a year of loafing, I joined other Air Force
retirees in the Curtis Mathes retail television
business until February 1996.  Since retirement from
the Air Force in 1977 much of my time has been devoted
to travel and golf.

Personal data includes:

   Marriage      Marna Holcomb     1956-1965   
Divorced

   Marriage      Carol Vincenzi       1970-1995   
Deceased

   Marriage     Judy Wharton          1996-

   Son              David Golder         
Owner/operator Web site
                                                     
business Highland, CA –
                                                     
two children

   Daughter      Linda Anderson       Central
Intelligence
                                                     
  Agency Headquarters,
                                                     
  Virginia – three step-
                                                     
  children
 
Died September 2012

 

golders.jpg






GYLOV, PALLE R.









HIGUERA, HUMBERTO A.

1956




Hudson, Robert J
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HUDSON, ROBERT J.
(died June 21,2009)
 
 
 
 






IDLET, WALTER B.




LAWLER, ROBERT R.
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______________________________________

Kurt Jeff Lobaugh



After Vance AFB, Kurt went to first to Randolph AFB, TX

and B-29 training, then to Yokota AB, Japan and flew

KB-50s. They had their

second son while there. He returned to the US and

was assigned to England AFB,

LA. and KB-50s. With five or six years active duty

he left the service and

joined his father in the property and casualty

insurance business at Lodi,

CA. and soon joined the reserves flying C-130s at

McClellan AFB, CA.

Eventually he found a pilot spot with American

Airlines flying out of San Francisco

for several years until diagnosed with

cardiomyopathy and was grounded by

American. He worked at grape farming, eventually

dying at age 54. He was active in

his Masonic fraternity and local civic

organizations. His spouse Mary Ellen

(Kooyman) taught school for twenty-five years and is

retired at Lodi, CA.

They had two sons and a daughter: principal,

physician and teacher.







LOBAUGH, KURT J.
lobaugh.jpg
1985

__________________________________________________ 

Luhks, Ronald A.
 
 

Luhks, Ronald A.
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January 2004,Natural
 

MEEK, ROBERT H.
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1958 (F-86, Japan)



__________________________________

MCGUIRE, RICHARD L.
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Robert J. Miller
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Robert J. Miller Edit Text

Attended Pilot Training Class 56M at Bartow AFB, Florida and Vance AFB, Oklahoma.  Following graduation from Pilot Training he attended Multi-Engine Aircraft Training in TB-29s at Randolph AFB, Texas.  From there he went to Palm Beach Air Station, Florida for C-97 transition training.  He then was assigned to Barksdale AFB, Louisiana flying KC-97s as a Co-Pilot and Aircraft Commander.  His next assignment was to the 43rd Air refueling Squadron Larson AFB, Washington, flying the KC-135 as the Aircraft Commander and Instructor Pilot, Larson AFB closed so the squadron moved to Fairchild AFB where he continued to fly the KC-135 and later became a Command Post Controller.

 

The 9th Strategic Wing at Beale AFB was his next assignment as Director of the Command Post and later Director of Training for the SR-71.  He flew the T-29 and T-38 during this assignment. From Beale AFB he was assigned as an Investigative Officer, Investigations/Inspections Division Office of the Inspector General, US Military Assistance Command, and Vietnam.

 

Upon completion of his tour with the Army in Vietnam, he was assigned to Kin Chloe AFB as Director of Command and Control.  From there he went to Langley AFB, Virginia as a Battle Staff Emergency Actions Officer on the Cinclant Airborne Command Post aboard the EC-135.  He later became a Battle Staff Commander and Vice Commander of the Cinclant ABNCP.His last assignment was Commander of the 6th Airborne Command and Control Squadron at LAFB, Virginia flying the EC-135 in support of the Cinclant ABNCP.

 

Retiring from the Air Force in May 1985, he worked as a store manager of Hardware and Sporting Goods for one year. Because he missed flying, he quit his job and gained employment with Flight International as a Learjet Captain. He flew the Lear worldwide logging 7000 hours.

   

 Retired now, he lives with his wife Carole in Williamsburg, Virginia.  They were married June 13, 1954 in Waterloo, Iowa and celebrated their 50th Anniversary this past June.  They have two sons; Craig in New York, employed as a Quality Control Inspector in Nuclear Plants and Scott a Pharmacist in Harrisonburg, Virginia.  Also they have two grandsons: Devin a Crew Chief on A-10s in the USAF and Shane a student at Towson University.

  Edit Text

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Edit Picture





MILLIGAN, JOHN W.

(mid air St Lo, France)
(February 2, 1957)






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MOORE, RAY E.





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___________________________________

NICHOLSON, ROBERT L.
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NORDBY, CLYDE D.





 
 
_________________________________________

PICHON, JAMES D.
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1999(Natural)

Paluso, Charles F.
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CHARLES F. PALUSO


1. College at Oklahoma A&M (now OSU), from 1949 to Mar 1955.
2. Had 4 years Naval Reserve time.
3. Active duty Mar 1955. Officer orientation at Lackland.
4. Assigned to Bartow, FL for initial pilot training.
5. Finished pilot training at Goodfellow AFB, San Angelo, TX.
6. Assigned to 63rd Tactical Air Wing, Donaldson AFB, Greenville, SC.
7. Flew C-124, A&C models from 1956 to 1962. Flew all over the world.
8. Interesting TDYs to Germany; Frankfurt, Rhein Main Air Base.
9. Had tours to New Zealand supporting Operation Deep Freeze in 1959, 1960 and 1961.
10. In 1962 assigned to AFROTC Instructor duty after attending Squadron Officer School and Academic Instructor School at Maxwell AFB, Montgomery, AL.
11. From 1962 to 1966 taught AFROTC at St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia, PA. Did proficiency flying in U-3A, T-29, and C-47 at McGuire AFB.
12. From 1966 to 1970 assigned to Hickam AFB, flying C-124 aircraft and working in Wing Standardization. I think this was 61 MAW, MAC.
13. From 1970 to 1971 attended AC-119K gunship training at Lockbourne AFB, Columbus, OH.
14. In 1971 flew AC-119K gunships in Viet Nam, Thailand, and Laos.
15. From 1971 to 1975 assigned to the Memphis Air National Guard as Military Airlift Command Operational Advisor for C-124C aircraft.
16. In Mar 1975 assigned to the 443 Training Wing, Altus AFB, Altus, OK. Wing C-141 and C-5 aircraft.
17. In Mar 1983 retired from active duty and went to work for USPIRA, selling mutual funds.
18. In 1987 went into Insurance sales and as broker in Real Estate sales.
19. In 1996 full time working for myself in managing a sizable estate consisting of Real Estate and timber.
20. I managed to log 15,000 hours of military and civilian time. I learned to fly in 1951 while doing smoke jumper duty with the Forest Service, Missoula, Montana.
21. Was married to Doris in 1954 and fathered two boys and one girl. Divorced Doris in 1975 and now have Barbara.
22. My main passion is hunting and have hunted most states in the southern 48 plus Hawaii, Turkey, Germany, and want to try Africa next.
23. Had a medical crisis in 2003, needing a four way bypass surgery on the heart. 
24. Earned BS and MA degrees and working on a doctorate. Finished Command and Staff.
25. Died in 2009. 
Edit Text

CHARLES A. PFEIFFER
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CHARLES A. PFEIFFER (2005)


Following completion of preflight orientation at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, my basic flight training bases included Spence Air Base, Georgia, Williams AFB, Arizona and graduation at Laughlin AFB, Texas. Having no desire to become a career officer, I declined advanced crew training with its additional service commitment and headed off to F. E. Warren AFB, Cheyenne, Wyoming for supply training. Upon graduation in August 1956, I was briefly assigned in supply with the U-2 program at Turner AFB, Georgia. By late November I ended up at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, as a supply officer for a KC-97 tanker squadron. Cockpit-wise, I was assigned to “Base Flight”. We flew VIPs around the country in converted B-25s. As my three year separation date approached in 1958, I began to realize the Air Force was a really good life…and with a series of events too boring to discuss here, I signed the “indefinite” contract. It had a one-year Gentlemen’s clause assigning me as the Base Forestry Officer for Barksdale’s 19,600 acres of World War II gunnery and bombing range. It was the fruition of my college major and the exciting life of a pilot.



My assignment in aircraft maintenance to Randolph AFB, Texas in 1967 was pivotal. The major challenges which came to a head were: the need for flying time; My wife Joan, an Air Force Nurse (we married in Barksdale in 1961) came down with severe Multiple Sclerosis; the work schedule, flying functional check flights in T-38 and T-39 aircraft in support of the pilot training mission left no time to spare; still I was given the additional duty as Operational Maintenance Squadron Commander. This duty gave me great respect for our senior NCOs and a keen insight into the values of the young Airmen. Weekends were usually taken up on cross-country flights. We worked hard, played hard and partied…many careers were made (and broken) at the legendary Auger Inn. Truth is the best people I ever met in the Air Force converged at Randolph AFB in the late 1960s.



In September 1970 I applied and received a humanitarian assignment in Maintenance Quality Assurance and flight test to Wiesbaden Air Base, Germany (Joan was residing at a German Clinic for MS). Initially it was rough going as USAFE procedures were unlike anywhere else in the Air Force and I was working for Officers who had long ago retired on active duty. Lady Luck again came my way and I was selected to a newly formed CINC USAFE directed Maintenance Standardization and Evaluation Team (MSET). This team of nine officers and 35 top NCOs hit theatre bases on schedule or any given time. These new responsibilities and the situation at home led to my last flight in October 1973. The flight ledger recorded 3,300 plus hours of mostly behind the lines flying. Later as MSET Team Chief I experienced high level “tough love” priorities first hand. This exposure helped me to be picked in 1975 to command a 120 man remote NATO Weapons Storage Base in Araxos, Greece. We were under logistical support from USAFE, but mission-wise directly under Supreme Headquarters Allied Forces Europe. This was my most rewarding assignment.



It was back to the States in 1976 for a two-year hitch with the USAF IG at Norton AFB, California. From here in 1978 I was assigned to Quality Assurance at the McClellan Air Logistics Center in Sacramento, California. I also performed various duties at the Center as a trouble-shooter, IG, Chief of EEOC and Environmental watchdog. The latter experience has made me a life long adversary of the “tree-huggers”. Joan was called to heaven in 1983 and I retired as a Colonel in 1985.



Yes, a three-year flying commitment was parlayed into a thirty-year career…no plan, no regrets; lots of lessons learned (mostly too late) but I loved it.



I returned to Texas in 1985 to be with friends in the Randolph AFB area. Shortly thereafter, Nancy Kutzner, an Air Force Flight Nurse was assigned locally. We have been together, with a ripple or two in between, as “Significant Others” ever since. Prostate cancer came along in 2000. Although still eligible for surgery or radiation, I’ve opted for intermittent hormone therapy. So far, this decision (a crap shoot whatever therapy one chooses) is working well for me. I am enjoying the good life, puttering around with rental properties, traveling and spending summers doing lots of fishing in Alaska.



God Speed to my fellow classmates and their loved ones.



MILIATARY SERVICE

ORAL BIOGRAPHY

COLONEL CHARLES A. PFEIFFER, USAF (Ret.)

For UPT 56-M Classmates

(Transcribed circa-2005, updated May 22, 2010)

 

As a young man, Charles Pfeiffer attended Our Lady of Loretto Grade School and Xavier High School in the Cincinnati, OH. Charles matriculated at Michigan State College (majoring in Forestry) where he received his initial military indoctrination through the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Air Force upon graduation in 1954, beginning his active duty service in early 1955.

 

Following completion of preflight orientation at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, my basic flight training bases included Spence Air Base, Georgia; Williams AFB, Arizona; and graduation/winging at Laughlin AFB, Texas.

Having no desire to become a career officer, I declined advanced crew training with its additional service commitment and headed off to F. E. Warren AFB, Cheyenne, Wyoming for supply officer training. Upon graduation in August 1956, I was briefly assigned in the Supply squadron with the SAC U-2 program, 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Turner AFB, Georgia.

By late November I ended up at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana as supply officer for a SAC KC-97 tanker squadron. Cockpit-wise, I was assigned to "Base Flight" Rated Position Identifier (RPI) RIP-8. Our mission was to fly VIPs around the country in converted B-25 Mitchell bombers.

As my three year separation date approached in 1958, I began to realize the Air Force was a really good 1ife ...and with a series of events too boring to discuss here, signed the commissioned officer’s "indefinite" contract. It had a one year Gentlemen's clause, assigning me as the Base Forestry Officer for Barksda1e AFB, LA; 19,600 acres of World War II gunnery and bombing range. It was the fruition of my college Forestry-major, along with the exciting life of a gallant Air Force pilot.

I married Joan (Née Pucinelli) an Air Force Nurse, in the Barksdale AFB main chapel on January 28, 1961.

The Soviet’s first satellite "Sputnik" (launched in 1957) had changed SAC’s and my priorities, so in June 1961 I began a tour with the Air Force Institute of Technology at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas. This led to a B.S. in Industrial Engineering in March 1964.

I then received a directed-duty assignment to Kadena AB, Okinawa in base Civil Engineering. A year later, with the Vietnam effort building up, I was reassigned to the command post of the 18th Tactical Fighter Wing and checked out in their T-39A North American Sabreliner. Many of our missions were in support of 18th TFW F-105D/F Thunderchief fighter squadrons, already fighting from Korat and Takhli RTAFB Thailand, flying strike missions in both North and South Vietnam.

My aircraft maintenance assignment at Randolph AFB, Texas in 1967 was pivotal. The major challenges which came to a head were: (1) devotion to my wife Joan, who became ill with severe Multiple Sclerosis; (2) the need for flying time; (3) flying functional check flights in T-38 Talon and T-39 Sabreliner in support of the 3510th FTW undergraduate pilot training mission (4) and the work schedule left no time to spare. Still, I was given the additional duty as 3510th Organizational Maintenance Squadron (OMS) Commander. This duty gave me great respect for our senior NCOs and a keen insight into the values of our young Airmen. Weekends were usually taken up on cross-country instrument-navigation proficiency flights. We worked hard; played hard and partied (to the acceptable standards of the time) ...many careers were made (and a few were broken) at the legendary "Auger Inn" in the basement of Bldg 500, the O-Club at Randolph AFB. Truth is the best people I ever met in the Air Force converged at Randolph AFB in the late l960s.

In September 1970, I applied for and received a humanitarian assignment in Maintenance Quality Assurance and Flight Test section at Wiesbaden Air Base, Germany (Joan was residing at a German Clinic, treating her MS disease). Initially it was rough going, as USAFE procedures were unlike anywhere else in the Air Force and I was working for officers who had long ago retired-on-active-duty. Lady Luck again came my way and I was selected to a newly formed CINC USAFE-directed Maintenance Standardization and Evaluation Team (MSET). This team of nine officers and 35 top NCOs evaluated USAFE operations throughout the theatre, and provided wing, NAF, and MAJCOM commander’s with their out-brief findings.

These new responsibilities and the situation at home lead to my last flight in October 1973. My AF Form 5 Flight log recorded 3,300-plus hours of flying time.

Later as MSET Team Chief, I experienced high level 'tough love' priorities first hand. This exposure and experience lead to a 1975 command assignment for NATO’s 345 Air Munitions Company [Special Weapons Storage] a 120-man remote assignment at Araxos Air Base, Greece. Although we were under logistical support from USAFE, mission-wise our OPCON was directly under the control of Supreme Allied Headquarters (SHAPE). This was my most challenging and rewarding assignment.

It was back to the States in 1976 for a two-year hitch with the USAF Inspector General at Norton AFB, California. From there in 1978, I was assigned to Quality Assurance at the McCel1en Air Logistics Center in Sacramento, California. I also performed various duties at the Center as a trouble-shooter, IG, Chief of EEOC and Environmental watchdog. The latter experience has made me a life-long adversary of tree-huggers. While assigned in California, my wife Joan was called to Heaven in 1983. I then retired from the Air Force in the rank of Colonel during 1985.

Yes, a three year flying commitment was parlayed into a thirty year Air Force career ...no plan, no regrets; lots of lessons learned (mostly too late) but I am secure in the belief that I played-the-cards dealt to me, honorably.

I retired to south-central Texas in 1985 to be with friends in the greater Randolph AFB area.

Shortly thereafter, Nancy Kutzner, an Air Force Flight Nurse, was assigned locally and we became 'Significant Others'.

Prostate cancer came along in 2000. Although still eligible for surgery or radiation, I opted for intermittent hormone therapy.

Nancy and I were married on February 8, 2008, with a blessing of our wedding vows in Chapel #1 at Randolph AFB on May 9, 2008. A wedding reception followed in the Randolph Room at the Randolph O-Club. Nancy was radiant [Charles was a handsome groom!] 

I’ve enjoyed a good life, puttering around with rental properties, traveling, and spending my summers doing lots of fishing in the fertile seas of Alaska.

Godspeed to my fellow UPT 56-M classmates and to their loved ones.

 

Charles A. Pfeiffer

Born May 19, 1932. Died May 22, 2010.

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Redinger, Thomas B.
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Thomas B. Redinger

 

Thomas B. Redinger, aged 78, succumbed to advanced Parkinson’s disease at The Normandy in Rocky River, OH on Friday, March 19, 2010. He was the son of Kitty Collins and Ruel Otis Redinger, and was born in Washington, PA on August 13, 1932. Tom was the third of four children: Patricia Redinger Lee, Ruel O. Jr, and younger brother James. The family moved to Bay Village, OH in 1941 when Tom was nine years old and remained there until the late 1990s.

Following in his father’s, mother’s (his maternal grandfather had been a bare-fisted prizefighter at the turn of the century) and older brother’s footsteps, Tom loved and lived sports. He lettered at Bay High School in football, basketball and track. He was a life guard at Huntington Beach during the summers. He won a full sports scholarship to Purdue University and played varsity football as a halfback and offensive end from 1951 through 1953. His teammate Bernie Flowers remembered Tom scoring the touchdown during the 1952 Purdue-Illinois game, the first Purdue game ever televised, which started Purdue’s scoring momentum for the remainder of the game. Tom remarked to his teammate that his grandfather, Ruel Otis Redinger, an all American at Colgate, had played at this same stadium.

After his graduation from Perdue, Tom joined the USAF and flew jets for the Strategic Air Command from 1954 to 1958. He married Jane Anne Irwin on October 15, 1956 and they had three children: Deborah Ann, Teresa Jane and Thomas B. Jr.

Leaving the Air Force, the family settled in Rocky River, OH. Tom coached extra-curricular football for 5th and 6th, and 7th and 8th graders. He entered the investment field, working for William J. Mericka, J. N. Russell and others. When he formed his own investment advisor company, TBR Associates, his lifelong devotion to sports led him to include many clients involved in professional sports, and he aided in the development of tennis and other sports resort complexes. With a number of partners, he invested in the Bay Point property (opposite Cedar Point, OH), a peninsula jutting into Sandusky Bay near Marblehead, OH. The partners developed Bay Point into a thriving marina and condominium resort.

Sadly Tom was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 1974 at the age of 42. His superb physical condition probably helped to slow the progression of the disease for the remaining 36 years of his life, but he gradually lost his ability to continue his normal physical activities and his professional career was cut short. His beloved wife Jane and his three loving children cared for him. His many devoted and generous friends remained close and supportive throughout his illness.

Tom was distinguished by a kind and gentle disposition. He was especially fond of young people, and his eyes lit up when his children and grandchildren were near. He found humor in most things, and lived a satisfying and full life despite his physical limitations brought on by Parkinson’s. He was loved by all who knew them in full measure. He made the world a better place and he will be sorely missed.

He is survived by his wife Jane and children Deborrah Kompanik (Gary) of Abu Dhabi, Therese of Boston, MA and Tom Jr. (Cynthia) of Gloucester, MA. He was the loving grandfather of Lindsey, Elizabeth and Matthew Kompanik and Thomas B. Redinger III "Tucker".

 
 
 



Thomas B. Redinger



Married October 27, 1955 to Jane Irwin

3 Children and 4 Grandchildren

Andrews Air Force Base
Wichita Falls, TX Auditing School
Homestead, FL Auditor for Air Force

Flew C-119s

1958 Moved to Avon Lake, OH
1961 Moved to Rocky River, OH
2003 Moved back to Avon Lake, OH

1958 Investment Business
1964 Started Investment Advisor Fund
1969 Invested in Bay Point Marina, Marblehead, OH (still a partner)

Redinger, Thomas B. and Jane
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REED, EDWARD S.
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2006

 
 
 
Lloyd R. Reeder
 
 
 

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Overview: Lloyd and Ruth Ann celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary on January 17th of 2006. They have enjoyed a happy, exciting, and eventful life together, which they have graciously shared with their four children (along with their spouses), five grand children, five great-grand children, and countless friends and colleagues. Lloyd takes pride in his family and accomplishments throughout his career. He played a critical role in getting the Apollo spacecraft approved for flight after the disastrous fire on Apollo 1, and then went on to play a leading role in the successful training of astronauts for Apollo 11 and Apollo 13. His promotion to Lt. Colonel was due in part to an evaluation written by James A. Lovell, Captain USN, for his work on Apollo 13, which was endorsed by Thomas R. Stafford, Colonel USAF, and Apollo astronaut. The last big bang in his post Air Force career, with Lockheed Martin, was leading the launch team for the 1st Titan IV Centaur/Milstar launch on February 7, 1994.



Details: Flying and the Air Force were a very important part of his life and fortunately they were both good to him. After graduating with you, his classmates in 56-M, Lloyd went on to San Antonio where he flew B-25's and B-29's during multi-engine training. The next stop was McClellan AFB in Sacramento and his first date with an RC-121 Super Constellation. After a quick trip to Montgomery for Squadron Officer's school, he returned to Sacramento and drilled holes in the sky over the Pacific until he was transferred to Yakota AFB outside of Tokyo. At Yakota he kept current in a T-33 (becoming an instructor pilot) while working as an Operations Officer, where he honed his skills in planning and logistics that would help him succeed at NASA and Martin Marietta.



Three short years later Lloyd was back at McClellan for his second date with "Connie". He participated in the Cuban Missile Crisis; flying over the ocean, right on the deck, in an RC-121 (with the radar pointing up) providing critical radar coverage for reconnaissance aircraft over-flying Cuba.



In 1963 the Air Force took Lloyd out of the sky and moved him underground as a Minuteman Missile Launch Crew Commander and Instructor at Whiteman AFB in Knob Noster, Missouri. At Whiteman, Lloyd earned an MBA from the University of Missouri, and actually got to launch a Minuteman from Vandenberg AFB as part of a test. The warhead landed in an atoll in the South Pacific, close enough to the aiming point to have vaporized it with a real nuke. To keep current, Lloyd flew a U-3A between stints in the capsule and a graduate school classroom.



In November of 1967 the Reeder family moved to Friendswood, Texas as Lloyd traded an inground capsule for one designed to fly to the moon. His original assignment at NASA was as a liaison between NASA and USAF. However, he immediately got bored and volunteered to participate in a test of the Apollo spacecraft to monitor and evaluate redesigned components. Along with two other Air Force pilots, Lloyd completed a few months of Astronaut training, donned a spacesuit, headed into the vacuum chamber and climbed into an Apollo spacecraft that was sitting on a turntable, surrounded by sun lamps on one side and radiators filled with liquid nitrogen on the other, to simulate the rigors of spaceflight. He was the first person to open the new escape hatch in a "space" environment. The 2TV-1 test went so well it was halted ahead of schedule and the spacecraft was approved for flight. A picture of Lloyd in his spacesuit made it into a "Look" magazine article about Apollo's race to the moon.



Participation in the 2TV-1 program brought Lloyd to the attention of the astronaut office, and an assignment as Mission Training Coordinator for Apollo 11. He coordinated all training and travel activities for prime and back-up crews. Demand for their time was incredible. Right before the launch he even coordinated family visits and scheduled haircuts. Some demands on the crew came from unexpected places. For example, since both of their sons were Eagle Scouts, Ruth Ann worked on Lloyd until he promised to ask the crew (also Eagle Scouts) to say hello to the Boy Scouts at the 1969 Jamboree in Idaho. The crew agreed, and their greeting was written into the flight plan and delivered during a television broadcast on their way to the moon.



As a side bar: Deke Slayton's (Mercury astronaut) and Dave Lowe's (Director of NASA) sons were in the same troop, at the Jamboree, with Lloyd's two sons, Mike and Lloyd. However, his two sons (Lloyd and Mike) were chosen to welcome Frank Borman (Gemini and Apollo 8 Astronaut) to close the Jamboree; a task typically reserved for the President. Nixon was busy welcoming the Apollo 11 crew back to Earth, so he appropriately sent an astronaut in his place.



Lloyd's responsibilities with Apollo 11 wound down during the crew de-briefing. He claims that he was only a glorified tape recorder operator. Isn't that exactly how you would expect him to describe the once in a lifetime thrill of sitting next to one of the original seven astronauts, Deke Slayton, while listening to an analysis of the first landing on the moon and the flight there and back? By the way, he was present for the debriefing of the Apollo 13 crew after their fateful mission.



His work on Apollo 11 was greatly appreciated by the entire crew, so Michael Collins wrote a letter of thanks, which he signed along with Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin. Lloyd's achievements were also recognized by the Air Force, who awarded him the Legion of Merit, which was presented by Colonel Aldrin.



As an encore, Lloyd was appointed Mission Training Coordinator for Apollo 13. The entire family played a role in this mission. Lloyd's sons (Lloyd and Mike) mowed Ken Mattingly's yard so he could concentrate on training and the older of his two daughters (Ruth Ellen) exposed Ken to measles. His youngest child (Susan) played a role by keeping him entertained in the evenings.



Although Lloyd officially kept current in a C-47, he flew all around the US in T-38's and T-33's with the astronauts. He once did a back seat landing in a T-33 that didn't wake up Fred Haise (Apollo 13) until Lloyd slowed the plane after landing. "That's the way to grease them Reeder!" As previously mentioned, the Apollo 13 crew valued his skills and the training that got them home. Jim Lovell wrote an OER for Lloyd that helped get him promoted to Lt. Colonel.



Like others in your class, Lloyd participated in the South East Asian War games. In 1970 the Air Force ordered him on a third date with "Connies", so he returned to McClellan for a refresher course before heading to Korat RAFB, Thailand in October. He flew EC-121's that were dressed in camouflage and loaded with electronic gear, up and down trails in Laos and Cambodia as well as North and South Viet Nam. Technicians in the back monitored sensors and called in air strikes on trucks and combatants. One unfortunate evening they called in a strike on elephants that had escaped from a logging camp. He also flew a "special" mission out of Saigon. The task was tracking a VC carrier pigeon, loaded with electronic tracking devices, back to its headquarters. Strike aircraft, soldiers, and Marines were staged and waiting for a target. The operation was scrubbed when the pigeon died of a heart attack while trying to climb to altitude with a load that was significantly above his max designed/rated takeoff weight.



Ultimately Lloyd accrued nearly 7,000 hours in various versions of the Lockheed Super Constellation, which proves that he truly is a "Real Man"; because everyone knows that only a "Real Man" can handle three pieces of tail at once.



Back stateside in October of 1971, Lloyd began working with NORAD at the Cheyenne Mountain facility in Colorado Springs, moving through a variety of staff and leadership assignments. His final command was as Chief of the NORAD Space and Missile Intelligence Center.



Lloyd retired from the Air Force in July of 1976 to join Martin-Marietta to work on Space Defense Command and Control Systems. He later worked on the military space shuttle launching complex at Vandenberg AFB before the program was cancelled. Lloyd retired from Martin in January of 1995, batting 1000, after the successful launch of the first Titan IV Centaur/Milstar combination on 7 Feb 94.



After retiring from a second successful career, Lloyd settled into his woodworking shop and garden. He also became an avid bird and wildlife watcher in the comfort of his own back yard on Denver High-Line Canal. Currently Lloyd resides in an Alzheimer's assisted care facility in Littleton, Colorado. If he could remember you, he would laugh and joke with you, and enjoy sharing stories. Thank you for allowing me to tell you his story in his place.


Respectively prepared and submitted to Class 56M by your classmate's son, Lloyd R. Reeder, with the help and support of the entire Reeder family.




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RUBEOR, RUSSELL G
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May 7, 2010

SCHWARZ, JR., JOHN J.
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SHOBERT, RICHARD A.

(mid air St Lo, France)
(February 2, 1957)





 
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Slater, David A.
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April 1, 2006 from ALS disease

April 2, 1935 born in Denver, Colorado


1952 graduated from high school in Portland, Or


1954 enlisted USAF, Lackland AFB, Texas


1955 started Aviation Cadets, Lackland AFB, TX


April 27, 1956 Wings and Commission at Laughlin AFB, TX


1958/1959 Korea, peacetime


1964 Vietnam, wartime


1955 to 1965 T-33, F-86, F-100, C-123, others...2,800 hrs.


1965 to 1995 American Airlines, DC-6 to 747...16,000 hrs.


1995 to 2006: lived in San Antonio with Elfriede K., wife


2006: Died on April 1, 2006 from ALS disease












________________________________________________________________

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"David A. Slater of Garden Ridge passed away Saturday April 1, 2006 after a valiant and courageous battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Mr Slater was born April 2, 1935 in Denver, Colorado and grew up in the Pacific Northwest, before joining the USAF in 1954. He served in both Korea and Viet Nam before joining American Airlines where he continued his love of aviation as Captain, piloting jetliners across the Atlantic Ocean to Europe and deep into South America before retiring in 1995 from the Dulles/Ft Worth International base. Dave had many interests and hobbies including automobile restoration, construction projects, and spending time with a wide circle of family and friends. Survivors include: loving wife Elfriede, son Steven Slater of New York City and grandson Brandon Christopher of Frankfurt, Germany; step-daughter Lisa Prouix of San Antonio,TX; step-son David Prouix of Garden Ridge, TX; step-son and wife, Steven and Estela Prouix and grand-daughter Emily, of Converse, TX; sister and brother-in-law Helen and David Kellogg of Wenatchee, WA; brother and sister-in-law Donald and Edna Slater of Portland , OR, and brother and sister-in-law Neil and Dorothy Slater of Seattle, WA. Memorial services were held on April 6th at the Schertz Funeral Home Chapel in Schertz, TX"






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STEELE, RALPH D.
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SWENSON, JOHN A.
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March 1956 (T-33, Webb)

 
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TOPPER, CHARLES W.

(B-57  RVN)







Tuttle, Duane L.





Born October 3, 1934 and died February 3, 2004

Duane attended Purdue University and graduated from Omaha University in 1964. His military career took him to Schilling, McConnell, Forbes, Little Rock, McChord, DaNang Vietnam, Travis, Altus AFBs and numerous other places on TDYs. He retired after serving 22 years in the U.S. Air Force, having piloted over 20 different types of aircraft.



Duane loved classical music and attended concerts. He was very precise in everything he did. Writing was a gift he enjoyed. In his prayers he always reminded us to be mindful of the needs of others, and how thankful we should be.



He was chaplain of the Daedalians military pilots organization and helped organize numerous military reunions. Duane was the instigator behind this Pilot Training Class 56M reunion and recommended that it be held in San Antonio, TX in April 2006 on the anniversary of our graduation from pilot school.

He was the President of the Lindsborg, KS Kiwanis Club and served on the board of the Lindsborg Community Hospital. Duane enjoyed being a member of the Wild Dala Horse Drill Team and wrote the lyrics for each unveiling of the Dala Horses. He was an avid community project volunteer. Duane sang in the choir, was treasurer of the Memorial Committee, member of the Fellowship Committee, and past board member of Messiah Lutheran Church. Also, he sang in the Bethany, KS Oratorio Society. In addition, he was a member of the Scandinavian Society, and enjoyed working at the Andersons Butik.



God granted him 17 extra years when he received his heart transplant and lived to the fullest extent. Duane was a dedicated advocate of donor awareness and presented numerous speeches on the importance of the issue, "The Gift of Life". He participated in 5 Transplant Olympic Games, winning 3 Gold and 4 Bronze medals.



Duane always kept his donor, Nathan, in his heart. God gave him Six Thousand, One Hundred and Seventy bonus days. The gift of life continues on, with Duane's donation of his corneas. Thus his life touched many people.



Duane and Kally were married over 45 years. They had one son, Kevin and two daughters, DeAnn and Kea and five grandchildren. They loved to travel whenever possible to visit family and friends.



TUTTLE, DUANE L.
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February 2004 (Natural)






WIGGINS, JOHN C.
 
 
 
 
 

Wiggins, John C.
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Winney, Lynn E
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WINNEY, LYNN E.
F4U crash 1965
Los Angeles Air Races